Great

Venison

Cooking

About Us

Founded over a decade ago, Great Venison Cooking is focused on showing you how to prepare and cook venison in the best ways possible. Haley R. Sears is the brain behind this successful blog. He dedicates his quality time to providing quality content on how to cook venison.

Haley Sears has authored various cookbooks on venison, including tips for cooking venison. He’s also experienced in gardening and enjoys sharing recipes. Haley harvests fresh produce from his garden to prepare delicious meals you can pair with venison.

Deer-hunting season is a great time to fill your freezer with venison. We can help you plan your meals for the best red meat you can prepare in your kitchen or restaurant. We’ll also teach you how to cook with venison for some of the tastiest meals out there.

Unlike other red meats, venison has superior texture, flavor, and health benefits if prepared correctly. It’s rich in Vitamin B6, B12 an Omega 3 fatty acids, but low in cholesterol and fats.

Whether you intend to cook venison for your family or clients, you can pair it with fresh produce from your garden for healthy meals. If you’re new to cooking venison, here’re five things you should know about preparing this tasty red meat.

Tips On Cooking Venison

Never overcook your venison – Most people make the mistake of overcooking venison when preparing it. This results in meat that’s gamey and rubbery. Unless you’re mixing your meat with pork for added fat or braising it, you can serve tender venison cuts as rare or medium-rare.

Opt for dry marinades and rubs – If you want to marinate your venison, opt for dry rubs and marinades. Dry rubs usually contain coffee and salt or ginger. They break down red meat enzymes to give you tender red meat. However, they don’t tenderize like other tenderizers that make your meat mushy-like.

Most marinades make use of vinegar, wine, lime juice or lemon and other acids to denature proteins in meats. Use a zip top bag when marinating your red meat for easy clean up later.

Age your venison in the right way – Do you use a processor for your deer meat? If yes, you can expect that your red meat comes already aged. Find out how the processor ages the deer meat or the method used.

If you process your deer meat personally at home, opt for dry aging before freezing your venison. First, refrigerate the red meat on a rack set at a consistent temperature of 340 to 370 degrees over a pan for a minimum of 7 days. You can dry age the meat for up to 14 days.

On the converse, you can thaw the meat in your refrigerator to wet age it. Use the vacuum-sealed packaging it comes with and do the refrigeration for a maximum of 14 days for the best outcomes.

Whether you’re new to cooking venison or enjoy preparing the red meat from time to time, you’re in the right place. We’ll provide you with all the informational resources you need to prepare and enjoy venison from the comfort of your home.

They Hunt. I COok.

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Marinated Venison

Marinated Venison Marinating deer steak is highly recommended because there's no fat on the venison. You will want to marinate your venison in a sealable plastic bag. Ingredients 2 tablespoons Worcestershire Sauce 2 tablespoons Soy Sauce 1/2 cup Olive Oil 2...

How to Age Your Venison

How To Age Your Venison Just like all types of meat, venison requires a lot of hang time. Aged venison or deer meat has a better flavor than venison that hasn't been aged. Furthermore, natural enzymes break down connective tissue, effectively tenderizing the meat....

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